Archive | Guest Perspective

Review: Swiftwick Socks Help Runners Recover

aspire-zero-black-compression-socks-9652larCompany’s compression socks and sleeves offer athletes comfort during activity and recovery afterward, in many styles and colors.

By Henry Howard

I’m a guy so it’s no surprise that I lack the shopping gene.

When I became a runner, I had no idea there were so many options for shoes, socks, shirts, shorts, headwear, gloves and the list goes on. I knew I wanted a good pair of running sneakers and running clothes that wouldn’t chafe me. And I knew better than to wear a cotton T-shirt while running. Continue Reading →

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Runner Sportsmanship

postracefoodfrenzyThe recent display of greed at a Cincinnati road race shouldn’t indict all runners. We have our issues but good sportsmanship regularly prevails.

By Henry Howard

I was appalled to learn of the food looting perpetrated by some of the 15,000 runners in the recent Thanksgiving Day Race in Cincinnati. There seemed to be plenty of energy bars, fruit, drinks and other recovery fuel on hand.

But that wasn’t enough for some of the runners who readily ignored giving thanks for the day, and instead greedily filled their boxes with food. Not only did a local food bank not receive an influx of leftovers, many of the runners were left without snacks after the 10K race.

“There were people jumping in dumpsters to find bigger boxes,” race director Julie Isphording told the Cincinnati Enquirer. “I couldn’t believe it. People brought bags of their own just so they could stuff them full.” Continue Reading →

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10 Years, 50 Marathons, 50 States

EdLoyRunning a marathon in every state requires proper training, sound logistics and financial planning. It takes a little more for those who live in Hawaii like Ed Loy.

By Henry Howard

Ed Loy was fed up with himself in September 2004. At the time, he was a 280-pound college senior interviewing for jobs. He was convinced that no one was hiring him because of his weight.

“I made a resolution to lose the weight and finally get in shape,” said Loy, whose previous athletic track record consisted of playing pick-up basketball with college friends. “At first, I walked a lot to school and home. Then took up workout DVDs at home (Tae Bo). I lost the initial 25 pounds this way, but wanted more.”

So, at the encouragement of a friend and former “Biggest Loser” contestant, Loy joined a gym in May 2006. “I became a strength junkie, but the weight didn’t come off,” he said. “I walked/jogged on the treadmill and thought this was a little fun. Once the scenery got old, I started to run outside near my home. As the distances increased, the more fun I was beginning to have, but it was a challenge just to stick with it. Eventually, I started to look into racing and did my first half marathon in September 2007.” Continue Reading →

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Running to Beat Cancer (Again)

IMG_9390Darrell Henry lost his colon to cancer. Now, he’s lacing up his running sneakers once again to fight cancer the only way he knows how.

By Henry Howard

Darrell Henry has no colon. But he has a heart, the heart of a champion.

Henry’s colon was removed in June 2013 “because of hundreds of polyps and a large cancerous tumor brought on because of familial adenomatous polyposis, a genetic disorder which causes polyps in basically any part of the body. With hundreds of colon polyps it’s inevitable some will become cancerous.”

The biggest drawback to being colon-less: Hydration. “Most of the body’s hydration occurs in the colon. I drink 150-200 ounces per day to stay properly hydrated,” he says.


Doctors used a section of small intestine to build a replacement (called a j-pouch) for the colon and followed up by 12 rounds of chemo. Henry endured one round of chemo every other week for six months.


Henry decided to enjoy the experience as much as possible and dedicate himself to running.

“My intention was to fight as hard as I could, take any treatment necessary and beat cancer but also to gain as much positive from the experience as I could,”

says Henry, who tries to run 50 to 70 miles a week, even during chemo. Continue Reading →

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Musician Conquers Alcoholism, Then Ultras

10003585_10204714372890015_6944650481230729807_o-2Just running wasn’t enough for Ryan Deguzis to break his addiction. It did play a role, however, and now he is loving life and giving back.

By Henry Howard

MTA member Ryan Deguzis has a lot going for him: he’s a classical musician, teaches students, has a steady girlfriend and recently finished his first ultra marathon.

But it wasn’t always like this. Like millions of Americans from all walks of life — millionaires to soccer moms — Deguzis battled an addiction to alcohol. He’s been sober for 3 ½ years now.

“Running was one of the things that helped me escape alcoholism,” he says. Continue Reading →

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4 Simple Ways to Have a Stress-Free Marathon

Jason HM RacingThe marathon can be a daunting effort. At 26.2 miles, it takes months of focused preparation and training to feel confident on the starting line.

Race day is when all that training is put to the test: the countless miles, the tempo and marathon-pace workouts, and the weekend long runs that inspire confidence in covering the marathon distance.

But while all the hard work is already done, you’re not quite finished yet! Many runners who have put so much time and effort into their marathon training put virtually none into their race day planning. A successful marathon demands advance planning so there’s as little stress as possible the morning of the race. Continue Reading →

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Top Half-Dozen Things I Learned During My First Six Marathons

Indianapolis Monumental Marathon 2014

Indianapolis Monumental Marathon 2014

You’ve completed the training for a marathon. But don’t toe the start line without planning your race, choosing a mantra and remembering to have fun.

By Henry Howard

Yesterday I completed marathon number six, the Indianapolis Monumental Marathon. It’s actually the third time I’ve run 26.2 at the Monumental. But, hey, it’s a wonderful race and only 60 miles from my house, so it figures to be a constant for me.

This blog post isn’t intended to rave about the Monumental (but I could) or replace Angie Spencer as a coach (which I could not). Instead, I wanted to share the top six things I’ve learned since completing my first marathon, roughly two years ago today. Continue Reading →

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Don’t Let Laces Trip You Up

iStock_000010507412XSmall - CopyThat unicorn for amateur runners, the four-hour marathon, eluded me by 70
seconds in my first road race. That was spring 2009, the Martian Marathon in Dearborn, Mich..

Two and a half years later, I attempted to break four hours again in the
2011 Detroit Free Press Marathon. Missed
it by almost three minutes.

Lots of factors contributed to these near misses: rookie marathon training
mistakes, going out too fast, not fueling properly, cramps. But I want to
focus on, and celebrate, one factor that is so simple but took me several
marathons to do anything about.

Shoelaces. Continue Reading →

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From Couch to Ultra Runner

Molly Badwater 2009 (1)Molly Sheridan was told “she was too old” to run. Since then, she’s completed 50 ultras, including a 138-mile run in the Himalayans that no woman had previously finished.

By Henry Howard

A friend called Molly Sheridan, inviting her​ to run the Marine Corps Marathon, her first attempt at 26.2 miles. It would be fun, the friend advised.

At the time, Sheridan was 48, had a full-time job and was raising three kids. She had a lot on her plate. What she didn’t have was an athletic background. Growing up in California, she swam at the beach and as an adult did some running/walking 5Ks but nothing serious.

She told her friend, “No, it sounds awful. What is that? Twenty miles or something?” Sheridan recalls, adding that she said “no” about 10 times. Then something happened that would change her life. “I was haunted all night, tossing and turning, punching my pillow. Then I thought what have I been doing for exercise?”

And, thus, the quest began. “The first mile out the door was awful. I thought I was going to have a heart attack,” the Las Vegas resident says. Continue Reading →

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Runner’s Amazing Year: Surgery, Boston and Cover Model

Lindsey Hein photoLindsey Hein is a mom, wife, employee and coach — and still finds time to run, including a second Boston Marathon finish.

By Henry Howard

The past year has been full of momentous occasions for Lindsey Hein.

The long-distance runner from Indianapolis learned she had the BRCA 2 gene mutation in July 2013, the day before her first half Ironman. The gene increases a woman’s risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

Hein was determined to finish the race, which she did. It turned out to be her “find your strong moment.”

She opted to have a prophylactic double mastectomy in October 2013, with reconstruction in January 2014.

Three months after her surgery, Hein finished the Boston Marathon. Again. Continue Reading →

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